3 Japanese Folk/ Pop Songs for percussion trio

 

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Wadatsumi no Ki: ワダツミの木

by Gen Ueda

Piano arrange by Sachiko Ono

 

Difficulty: Intermediate


Duration: 5’18”


For three players: 1 vibraphone,  one 5.0 octave and one 4.6 octave marimba

 

(Description)

“Wadatsumi no Ki” is a debut song of Chitose Hajime and was one of the best hit in 2002. Hajime is originally from Amami, the South island of Japan and trained traditional min'yō (Japanese accompanied folk song) from her young age. Tittle means “Wadatsumi tree”. Wadatsumi is the god of the sea in Japanese myths. Lyrics describe that a girl became a flower because of falling love with the guy.

 

Nada SōSō: 涙そうそう

by Begin

Piano arrange by Sachiko Ono

 

Difficulty: Intermediate


Duration: 4’15”


For three players: 1 vibraphone,  one 5.0 octave and one 4.6 octave marimba

 

(Description)     

Nada SōSō“Great Tears are Spilling” is a song written by Japanese band “Begin” from Okinawa and lyrics by singer, Ryoko Moriyama. It was first released by Moriyama in 1998, but achieved popularity through the cover version by Rimi Natsukawa in 2001.

Tittle means that large tears are falling in Okinawa dialogue. When Moriyama found out the meaning of the phrase, it reminded her the death of her older brother in his young age. (The lyrics speak of looking through an old photo-book at pictures of somebody who has died. The protagonist of the song is thankful to them for always encouraging them, and for being happy no matter what. They believe they will meet them again one day, and cries as they send thoughts of sadness and love to that person.)

 

 

Shima Uta: 島唄

by Kazufumi Miyazawa

Piano Arr by Erika Shibuya

 

Difficulty: Intermediate


Duration: 4’15”


For three players: one 5.0 octave marimba and one or two 4.6 octave marimba

 

(Description)

Tittle means "Island Song” It is released in 1992 by the Japanese band “The Boom”. It was written by the lead singer, Kazufumi Miyazawa, based on his impressions from visiting Okinawa for a photo shoot. It is the band's best hit song, well known throughout Japan and Argentina, and one of the most widely known songs associated with Okinawa. The song uses a mix of modern pop/ rock styles as well as min'yō (Japanese accompanied folk song). Okinawan musical instruments and Okinawan vocabulary have been incorporated into the song. Although the title Shima Uta which is originally a term for traditional music from the Amami Islands, the term Shima Uta is currently used for traditional music from the Okinawa islands. Song is based on a couple of pentatonic scales. (Ex. do, mi, fa, so, ti [minor pentatonic structure on major scale])

3 Japanese Folk/ Pop Songs for percussion trio

SKU: TT-0015